The Receding Glaciers photographic project is an initiative to inform and educate people about the dramatic glacial recession that is taking place in the world's alpine regions.

The vast majority of scientists now agree that global climate change is caused by human activity and that the increase in average global temperatures is largely due to man-made, green-house gasses. It is also very likely that the increase climate variability and in extreme weather events is another aspect of global warming.

The past decade was the hottest on record and vast areas of the arctic ice pack are now melting every summer. However, in most temperate areas there is little evidence other than the irregular weather (not all of which is warm) to support global climate change. We certainly don't have a gauge on the wall, like a barometer to tell us what is happening. This is why the alpine glaciers are so important because they are tangible proof that something has changed to upset the balance that previously existed.

A good discussion of global warming and of how it is affecting our world is on the NASA Earth Observatory website. I also have a discussion about the Receding Glaciers Project in my Blog.

I strongly encourage everyone to see Chasing Ice, an exceptional movie with some amazing time lapse imagery showing glaciers receding over a period of several years.

The images on this webpage are available for download without charge for non-profit use by individuals and organizations to help promote public information and education about glacial recession and the perils of global warming.

These images may be downloaded by first signing in with your email address here.

Fine art prints of these images may also be ordered by contacting me.

All images and materials remain under copyright and commercial use without express permission by Jay W Page Photography is prohibited. Photo credit is required for non-profit usage.
Illecillewaet GlacierIllecillewaet GlacierAsulkan GlacierBow GlacierAthabaska GlacierAthabaska GlacierMount AthabaskaSkaftafellsjökull  Glacier, Iceland